Summer of Hacks

We've got an amazing series of summer events planned in addition to our regular monthly meetups. Check out our Summer of Hacks website for information and tickets.

Upcoming Events

Sat Aug 08 10:00 AM 25 are going

RailsBridge workshops are a free and fun way to get started or level up with Rails, Ruby, and other web technologies. Our events focus on increasing diversity in tech, so that people of all backgrounds can feel welcome and comfortable in our industry.

This workshop is intended to reach out to women who are interested in learning how to build interactive websites. Attendees should identify as a woman, and can bring a guest of any gender.

Interested in learning how to program? Never written a line of code before and are a little intimidated by nerds? There's no need to be! RailsBridge is a friendly place to get together and learn how to write some code.


Maybe you've written a little HTML and CSS before, or touched on Ruby or programming. Maybe you're completely new to this and ready for a challenge. All you need to attend is a laptop* and enthusiasm (*get in touch if you can't get hold of a laptop and we'll see what we can do).

We'll have some of the amazing people from New Bamboo on hand alongside the JSOxford and OxRUG volunteers, so there's plenty of help and mentorship available.

We'll have tea, coffee, snacks and drinks available throughout the day, as well as pastries in the morning and burritos for lunch. Please get in touch if you have any special dietary requirements and we'll sort you out.

We have two tracks: Frontend and Ruby on Rails. Programmers of all skill levels are welcome.

Ruby on Rails track

In this track we'll take you through building a complete web application using Ruby on Rails. By the end of the day, you'll have an application that connects to a database and reads and writes information. Even better, it'll be on the internet! You can see the activities for this track here. Don't forget to come to the Friday InstallFest (see below).

Frontend track

The Frontend track is all about HTML, CSS and JavaScript. We'll be building webpages, making them look *amazing*, and adding dynamic behaviour using JavaScript (click here to see the course syllabus) The only thing you need for this track is a text editor and the web browser you already use! Please download and install a programming text editor (Sublime Text or Atom are a good choice). Don't forget to come to the Friday InstallFest (see below).


Friday evening InstallFest

There's a lot to learn on Saturday, so it would be really helpful if everyone is set-up and ready to go. We'll meet up on Friday evening to install all of the software you need (or work through any problems you've had installing), and then spend Saturday learning and writing code.


If you can run through the InstallFest steps prior to attending that's also great. Even if you get stuck, please go through the rest of the instructions and download all the things you'll need. Bandwidth will be at a premium during the day, so it will help immensely to have everything on your laptop already.

Sponsors

We're very grateful to our sponsors for helping to make this event happen:


• Haybrook IT, for providing lunchtime burritos, snacks and refreshments.

• New Bamboo, for making awesome swag for attendees and bringing a cohort of Bambinos to help out.

• White October, for being an amazing venue.

• JetBrains, for sending a free WebStorm/RubyMine license for one lucky attendee as well as other goodies for attendees.

• Cucumber Pro, for donating a signed copy of the Cucumber Book, and other swag to hand out on the day.


Sat Aug 22 10:00 AM 19 are going

The JSOxHack is a full-day hack event to play with the technologies we've learned over summer, or anything else that interests us.

This is not a hackathon or competition, and there are no prizes. Instead it's a chance to hack with great people on interesting things. We'll start the day with a round of pitches, so if you've got any ideas bring them along. If you're just keen to take part there will be plenty of groups, and we've got mentors around all day to guide and support you.

At the end of the day anyone who'd like to can show and tell before we wrap up and head to Jo Perks for an evening of conversation and drinks.

Who should come?

Everyone! If you can write a bit of JavaScript you'll fit right in. We'll have plenty of mentors to help and guide you throughout the day, and the aim of the event is to have a good time.

What do I need to bring?

All you'll need is your own laptop (if you don't have one, just get in touch with us in advance and we'll do our best to sort you out).

If you have any leftovers from a previous event, components, devices or things you'd like to hack on, bring them along!


Location

Past Events

Sat Jul 25 10:00 AM 30 went

NodeBots are robots that are controlled by JavaScript. Come along for a day of hardware and software hacking, where we get to control the machines.

Gordon Williams will be joining us with a host of Espruino boards, components and wizardry. We also have a couple of node-powered RC cars, some Arduino Uno boards and a collection of components, as well as a few boxes of Lego Technic to let your imagination run wild.

This event is part of the International NodeBots Day.

Who should come?

Everyone! If you can write a bit of JavaScript you'll fit right in. If you know a little about electronics or Arduino then all the better, but it's not required. We'll have plenty of mentors to help and guide you throughout the day, and you've got the opportunity to hack on your own projects, play with some of the kit, or even just join a group and see what the day brings. The focus of NodeBots day is sharing and enjoying each others company.

What do I need to bring?

All you'll need is your own laptop (if you don't have one, just get in touch with us in advance and we'll do our best to sort you out), and it will help if nodejs is already installed.

If you have any components, devices or things you'd like to hack on bring them along!

We'll have tea, coffee, snacks and drinks available throughout the day, as well as pastries in the morning and burritos for lunch. Please get in touch if you have any special dietary requirements and we'll sort you out.

Who do I thank?

Mostly Ryan, totally Gordon and kind of Ben for organising the day, buying stuff, and being great.

Also,

Pusher- paid for the robot parts

Haybrook - bought us snacks, drinks & burritos


Espruino- Gordon provided the espruinos, both today and in general

White October - location, ambiance, people and coffee


Wed Jul 15 07:30 PM 35 went

IT’S. SO. SUMMERY.


You’re probably reading this in the park right now, which is totally great.

We’ve got three awesome talks that are definitely worth coming inside for (also, we’ll have some beers/juice so you can cool off).

Ruth John - A Journey Through Web API Space & Time


More browser APIs seem to be cropping up daily, it’s hard to keep track of what’s what and which is which. Don’t panic, Ruth takes us on a tour of what’s past, what’s present and what the future holds, so you can level up and feel a lot calmer about what’s on the event horizon.

Seren Davies - Death to Icon Fonts

Do you use icon fonts? Are you aware of their shortcomings? In this talk Seren will highlight some of the downsides with using icon fonts and show you an alternative.

Max Glenister - A running start at Google Cardboard with JavaScript

(This talk will not contain any actual running)

Gordon Williams - JavaScript for things

Controlling the real world with JavaScript and Espruino Pico. Gordon will show you how - and why - it's more fun to develop embedded software with JavaScript than C.


Wed Jun 10 07:30 PM 31 went

This month we're having a super-mega-meetup with OxRUG and the Oxford Python Meetup Group to look at open data and how we can leverage and contribute to global datasets. Open data is great in theory, but how can we go about actually using it, and what are the practical implications? Hopefully we'll find out!

Practical Open and Linked Data - Leigh Dodds

Leigh Dodds from the Open Data Institute will talk us through real-world open and linked data.

TBA

TBA

After the talks we'll host a discussion on the practicalities of open data, so bring along stories of success, failure, glory and pain!


As always, we've got some time for micro-pitches before we break out for drinks and discussion, so if you've got a job, project or interesting thing to share with the group that's your chance.


“First learn stand, then learn fly. Nature rule, Daniel-san, not mine.” — Mr. Miyagi, The Karate Kid (1984)

Saturday 23rd of May was International NodeSchool Day, with workshops focused on grokking Node.js taking place all over the globe.

The canny bods at JSOxford were running an event locally at White October’s offices in Oxford’s hip Cowley suburb as part of their Summer of Hacks programme. Intrigued by the thought of spending a day immersed in NodeJS, I duly sauntered along in my Vibram’s to see what was cooking in their Node kitchen. I’m glad I did because the day was proper station.

“Station!” — Ted, Bill & Ted’s Bogus Journey (1991)

The Morning

The day was structured such that the first half was spent working through the learnyounode workshop. This workshop is introductory Node material, covering topics such as asynchronous IO and the module system.

learnyounode workshop

This material is good and presented well via a lovely command line application. I’d recommend it to my colleagues to bootstrap their Node learning. Some of the error messages were a tad cryptic, but that’s easily addressed: one of the attendees even took the time to submit a Pull Request to improve the error message in one of the exercises.

Personally I didn’t get much from the material having already covered the content in my earlier explorations of NodeJS. It was good to structure the day this way though, because more experienced folk were thus pushed to pair with less experienced folk and there was plenty of knowledge-sharing and conversation which made me happy.

The Afternoon

The second half of the day was devoted to “electives”: material that covered a specific area of NodeJS to an intermediate level. (Promises, Express, Working With Binary Data, that sort of thing.). Folk were encouraged to pick an elective that interested them, and they could then either pair with like-minded folk or strike out on their own. If folk wanted to continue with the learnyounode module they could do that too.

I dipped in and out of a few electives, sampling them and getting a feel for ones that I’ll work through on my own time later. The Functional Elective isn’t particularly NodeJS-focused – being more of a general ES5 elective – but Ryan and I had a fun few minutes working through the trampolining exercise.

I liked that folk could investigate areas of NodeJS that appealed to them. The (slight) downside is that folk fragmented into isolated clusters and a little of the collaborative pair programming vibe was lost. I spent some of the afternoon wandering around asking folk about what they were working on and offering help where I could.

There was a definite “post burrito” slump after lunch :laughing: Thanks for the awesome lunch HaybrookIT, you rock!

The Evening

And then we retired the the pub for some drinks and fine banter. What happened at the pub stays at the pub though, so I will speak no more of it here save to mention that there was krumping.

What I Wanted From The Day

I use a lot of the Amazon Web Services stack in my day job and the recent release of AWS Lambda has opened the door to using NodeJS.

I wanted to spend the day knee deep in the mud of NodeJS: I wanted to wiggle my toes deep in the cool muck and get a good feel for the Node ecosystem.

What I Got From The Day

I spent ~6 hours immersed in NodeJS via the excellent material provided by the NodeSchool website.

I got to know about a great resource for bootstrapping the folk on my team into NodeJS. I also learned about cowsay. Finally, I got to enjoy the company of some great folk that I already know, and got to meet some new folk on the JSOxford scene.

Win.

Many thanks to Ryan and Ben from JSOxford for organising the day, to Sarah from HaybrookIT for sponsoring the event, to the NodeSchool community for providing such sweet resource, and to the folk that attended on the day.

Shout out to Adam for his stirring singalong of The Rains of Castamere. #awesome

“Lesson not just karate only. Lesson for whole life. Whole life have a balance.” — Mr. Miyagi, The Karate Kid (1984)


Sat May 23 10:00 AM 30 went

NodeSchool is a community driven, open source educational project that teaches JavaScript and node.js skills in an interactive, self-guided way. There are workshops available for every skill level from JS beginners all the way to experienced node programmers.

This event is part of International NodeSchool Day, so we'll be getting in touch with other NodeSchoolers around the world during the day.

Who should come?

Everyone! There are workshops for different abilities, and we'll have plenty of mentors to help and guide you throughout the day.

What do I need to bring?

All you'll need is your own laptop (if you don't have one, just get in touch with us in advance and we'll do our best to sort you out), and it will help if nodejs is already installed.

We'll have tea, coffee, snacks and drinks available throughout the day, as well as pastries in the morning and burritos for lunch. Please get in touch if you have any special dietary requirements and we'll sort you out.


Thu May 14 07:00 PM 46 went

We've two amazing talks lined up for May that will get you all eager to test your JavaScript!

Come join us for some drinks/snacks, a chat and learn some stuff.

Peter West

An introductory overview of JavaScript testing.


Ryan Brooks – The most convoluted JavaScript testing framework?


Ryan wants to talk about an abomination he built to test JavaScript running on the Rhino JavaScript engine, and how an optimistic "of course you can test that, it's just JavaScript" led to a rabbit hole and lost sleep.


Hi, I’m Dan. I studied Computer Science at the University of Bath where I learned absolutely no JavaScript whatsoever. When I was working on placement, I used jQuery to show and hide elements on a webpage, and that was it. Not exactly what you’d call sophisticated JavaScript is it?

That’s all I knew when I first joined JSOxford about a year ago.

One of the first events I attended was NodeBots, where I stuck some wires together and ended up with an Arduino that could tell me the temperature. Fast-forward a few months to the Realtime hack day, where I made a webpage which sends colours to everyone connected (Writeup here). I still feel like a beginner at every event I attend, but I really enjoy them and I’m keen to learn more!

No matter what your skill level is, you’re welcome to join us at any of our events. The hack days in particular are very beginner-friendly, where the main aim is to have fun. There’s always someone willing to teach the basics and get you started. Alternatively, if you know what you’re doing, you can just get on with what you want to do.

We’re always on the lookout for new members. If you haven’t been to a hack day before, our Summer of Hacks is the perfect place to get started. Learn, improve or perfect your JavaScript skills, and there’s free food, drink and stickers. What more could you want?


Sat Apr 11 09:30 AM 25 went

We're going to have a hack day centred around realtime web technologies.

It will be a day long event - with tonnes of opportunity to learn about, and hack with, technologies such as WebSockets, Server Sent Events, WebRTC, and more.

More details to come, but it's going to be awesome. (There might even be some stickers!)

Space is limited - so you must be signed up here to attend. (Also, only sign up if you're sure you can attend!)

Schedule

9.30 -start (pastries & coffee)
9.40 -hello, overview of data / tools
10.00 -project pitching / choosing
10.30 -kick off
12.45 -retrospectives
1.00 -lunch (🌟  burritos 🌟)
5.30 -show & tell
6.30 -recovery drinks at Joe Perks

What to bring

It'll be good to have a laptop with node/io.js installed. Any other web-connected devices (phones/tablets/raspberryPis) might be fun too.

We'll provide you with some sample code to get you up and running with some realtime apis/libraries.


If you have any particular ideas that you'd like to work on - have a think, and be ready to pitch it (max 60s); we'll be selecting a few ideas and working in teams throughout the day.


Wed Mar 11 07:00 PM 42 went

We've two great talks lined up for March; come on over, grab a drink/snack and learn some stuff.

We'll also have stickers(!!), pitches, and lots of lovely chats - hope to see you there!

Improving Web performance Using Grunt - Marcus Noble

In response to a previous talk by Andy Davies on performance I will walk through using Grunt to improve the performance of the JS Oxford website to achieve below the target 1000 PageSpeed index. This talk will look at configuration-only approaches that can be applied without the need to change any markup.

Playing With Trains: A Look At Open Rail Data - Tom Lane

Open data is happening. Many new technologies are emerging designed specifically to aid developers in taming and handling these datasets that have been made available to them, from new database ideas (NoSQL) to visualisation libraries (D3JS).

My talk will provide an overview of the data that has been made available from the rail industry with sources from National Rail, Network Rail and many others and the projects that have risen from it. There is a staggering amount of both quantity and depth available making for some pretty interesting possibilities.


Thu Jan 22 07:00 PM 41 went

It's always a good time to care about performance, and the new year is a great opportunity to focus on building our apps responsibly.


We're really excited to have Andy Davies coming to Oxford for this meetup. Andy is a web performance geek, in his day job he's Associate Director for Web Performance at NCC Group where he helps clients to measure and improve the performance of their sites.

He wrote the “The Pocket Guide to Web Performance” for Five Simple Steps and is a co-author of "Using WebPageTest" due to be published by O'Reilly in 2015.


We've also got some Oxford locals, and Tom Nickson's talk on compiling C++ into JavaScript is particularly interesting. Tom's doing a DPhil in machine learning, and has been doing some awesome things with emscripten.

Also, if you've ever had to test something in a crazy way, you'll be able to relate to Ryan's talk on testing.

Andy Davies – Whoosh - Speed Matters!


Great user experiences lead to more effective sites that have increased levels of engagement and revenue. Performance is an essential part of good user experience but all to often it get's pushed down the list of priorities.

In this talk Andy will explore why performance matters, how we can police performance and how the fundamentals of our medium influence the speed of our sites.

Tom Nickson – From C++ to JavaScript with Emscripten

Description coming soon.

Ryan Brooks – The most convoluted JavaScript testing framework?

Ryan wants to talk about an abomination he built to test JavaScript running on the Rhino JavaScript engine, and how an optimistic "of course you can test that, it's just JavaScript" led to a rabbit hole and lost sleep.


Thu Nov 27 07:00 PM 36 went

Thoughtful chats about AngularJS and React from Oxford's finest.


AngularJS: a grunt roadmap from karma to protractor


Julian will present a fundamental AngularJS archetype that provides a file layout, basic project example, dependency management for your app—bower—and for developing your app—npm—, unit—karma—and integration—protractor—test configuration, basic grunt tasks, and a Continuous Integration script.

Julian will also share some thoughts on what to commit—and what not to commit—, release repos, knowledge libraries, and showcase some examples that prove the power of AngularJS interacting with other technologies such as D3.

React: Rethinking Web Development


React is a JavaScript UI library that provides a new, and possibly better, way to achieve the goal of building simple and declarative UIs.

In this talk, Alex will explore the main design goal of React and how React changes web development for the better with some realtime examples.


After some discussion and some planning (inexplicably including macramé owls), we’ve moved to meetup.com.

meetup.com/JSOxford

Sign up, and tell all your friends.


Join us for a series of hands-on events this summer

We're taking a break from our evening meetups for the next few months. Instead, we're going to hold hack days, where you can come along to learn, tinker, hack & hang out with like minded people.

We’ve got three events planned, you’ll get a lot from them whether you’re starting out, or an experienced JS developer.

  • NodeSchool - get started (or better at) node.js.
  • Code Retreat - hack the way you approach coding.
  • NodeBots - JAVASCRIPT ROBOTS.

See below for more information and links to register for each event. We’ve got a limited number of tickets for each event, so sign up and put it in your diary. Tickets are £5.

We’re really looking forward to seeing you.


NodeSchool 21st June 2014

NodeSchool has finished - see how it went

NodeSchool is a community driven, open source educational project that teaches JavaScript and node.js skills in an interactive, self-guided way.

Register and attend if you want to meet up at the Jam Factory and dive into a nodeschool workshop. There are workshops available for every skill level from JS beginners all the way to experienced node programmers.

You will need to bring your own laptop, and it will help if you have already installed node.js. Mentors will help you on the day.

Register for NodeSchool


Code Retreat 6th July 2014

Sadly the Code Retreat is over – see how it went

Write better code to a backdrop of pastries and burritos… the Code Retreat is a chance to hone your programming skills without the pressure of Getting Things Done.

Following on from the success of the JavaScript Code Retreat in May we’re excited to be running the 2nd Oxford Code Retreat, and this time it’s Super-Mega! Want to get hone your JavaScript, Ruby or Python? Code Retreat is for you! This time we’re shifting the focus from TDD to functional and object-oriented techniques.

What is it?

Code Retreat is a day of pair-programming around a common challenge. Over five 45-minute sessions you’ll get to work with a variety of people to improve your day-to-day coding. At the end of each session we’ll regroup and share what we’ve learned.

For a nice introduction to code retreat and why it’s a great idea, check out this video.

Register for Code Retreat


NodeBots 23rd August 2014

NodeBots has now been dissassembled - write up coming soon

NodeBots are robots that are controlled by node.js. A NodeBots event is a full day event where JS developers team up in small teams to program robots with JS.

We’ve got 3 radio-controlled, video-enabled cars which can be controlled with JS over wifi, and also a nodecopter you can fly with JS (or just with your phone)!

We’ll have arduino kits you can use to build and program robots. You don’t need to know what a resistor is or how to use an aynschronous callback, we’ll have hardware and JS experts ready to help you throughout the day.

We’ve also extra sensors and displays you can tinker with. We’ve also got buckets of Lego Technic you can use to build quick prototypes.

You’ll be able to buy Arduino kits at a discount on the day, if you want to take your work home with you (sorry you can’t buy the lego though!)

Register for NodeBots

Please note:

We’ve moved the venue at the last minute, sorry! It will now be at the White October offices.

What does this mean for you?

  • Better food: we can now afford burritos and pizza for lunch, we’ll also have pastries and snacks throughout the day
  • Unlimited free tea and coffee
  • More space and desks, including workstations you can use
  • Fast, reliable internet
  • Air conditioning
  • Whiteboards
  • A meeting room for serious discussion
  • An HD projecter for talks and demos

We’ll be collecting people from the station and the Jam Factory, so don’t worry if you don’t know the way.


This event has finished, see the summer of hacks post for information about the next events

Write better code to a backdrop of pastries and burritos… the Code Retreat is a chance to hone your programming skills without the pressure of Getting Things Done.

Following on from the success of the JavaScript Code Retreat in May we’re excited to be running the 2nd Oxford Code Retreat, and this time it’s Super-Mega! Want to get hone your JavaScript, Ruby or Python? Code Retreat is for you! This time we’re shifting the focus from TDD to functional and object-oriented techniques.

What is it?

Code Retreat is a day of pair-programming around a common challenge. Over five 45-minute sessions you’ll get to work with a variety of people to improve your day-to-day coding. At the end of each session we’ll regroup and share what we’ve learned.

For a nice introduction to code retreat and why it’s a great idea, check out this video.


Thank you!

Thanks to everyone that came for an amazing day. Some great discussions were had, and only one or two language/editor wars!

Our sponsors

Support from Github & Haybrook & White October let us hold this event in such a lovely place, and kept us supplied with coffee and some drinks afterward.


Our organisers

Ryan and Ben put in a bit of time organising the event and building the testing system, but a huge thanks go to Pete and George for the Ruby & Python wrappers. Rich was generally awesome (as always).

Our attendees

We had almost three times the number of people for this Code Retreat. Thanks for coming! Please let us know what you thought of the day here.


As always, if you have any photos/blog posts about the day let us know.


This event has finished, see the summer of hacks post for information about the next events

NodeSchool is a community driven, open source educational project that teaches JavaScript and node.js skills in an interactive, self-guided way.

Register and attend if you want to meet up at the Jam Factory and dive into a nodeschool workshop. There are workshops available for every skill level from JS beginners all the way to experienced node programmers.

You will need to bring your own laptop, and it will help if you have already installed node.js. Mentors will help you on the day.


Thank you!

I think we can consider NodeSchool a success - a huge thanks to everyone involved

Our sponsors

Support from Github, Haybrook & White October let us hold this event in such a lovely place, and kept us supplied with coffee and some drinks afterward.


Our organisers

Roy and Ben put in a lot of effort over the last few weeks to organise this event. And on the day we also had Pete and Ivan who helped with mentoring on the day.

Roy wrote up the day on his site.

Our attendees

The turn out for NodeSchool was fantastic. Thanks to everyone who came along


Also, if you have any photos/blog posts let us know.


As part of digital oxford week we’re teaming up with Oxford Python for another mega-meetup

Please note - this won’t be at our usual venue, but at St Aldates Tavern

St Aldates


Getting functional with Clojurescript

by Matthew Thompson @cblop

Clojurescript is a dialect of lisp that compiles to Javascript. In this talk, we will go about making a basic game from scratch. Along the way, we’ll learn about setting up Clojurescript projects, using the Light Table IDE and how to design a game using immutable data structures. I’ll also explain why Clojurescript is useful for front-end web development.

Naming Things

by Gil Gonçalves @lurst

“There are only two hard things in Computer Science: cache invalidation and naming things.” – Phil Karlton In this talk, I will talk about naming things, telling you why is it hard to name, how to get better at naming and this will lead you to be an even better Software Developer.

Events - Code Retreat & Node School

Ryan Brooks will be talking about last weekends JavaScriptCodeRetreat - and how we can hold more in the future.

Roy Lines telling us about Node School, and gauging interest for a future event.

CPython VMs

by Mark

We’ll also be having a talk about CPython VMs from Mark. We don’t have more details than that - you’ll have to come along!


Special Thanks to…

GitHub

We’re able to meet in this lovely pub thanks to Github Community who are sponsoring the event.


There is also a Oxford Python event on Meetup - where you can sign up there if you consider yourself more toward the python side of Mega-ness.


We’re very excited to be part of JavaScript CodeRetreat

JSCR


Thanks for making it a success!

The first Oxford JS code retreat went really well in spite of a very early start. Pastries, coffee and burritos flowed, and we had some good discussions in the retrospectives and afterwards in the pub.

Here are a few links from the day:

We're really excited about the possibility for variations of the code retreat theme, in particular:

  • Mixing up Python, Ruby & Javascript developers for a cultural exchange
  • Focus on levelling-up JS: less focus on TDD, instead constrain the approach differently for each session to use 'the best bits' of JS
  • Focus on functional programming
If you're excited too or have ideas for how we could make it better, let us know!


Write better code, eat better food… The JavaScript code retreat is a chance to hone your programming skills without the pressure of Getting Things Done.

The JS Code Retreat is a day of pair-programming around a common programming challenge. Over 5 to 6 45-minute programming sessions you’ll get to work with a variety of people and work on improving your day-to-day coding, whether it’s TDD, DRY, naming, or whatever. At the end of each session we’ll regroup and share what we’ve learned.

For a nice introduction to code retreat and why it’s a great idea, check out this video.

What do I need to bring?

Just your good self and a laptop. If you’ve got a ready-to-go environment all the better, but if not we’d recommend TDDBin.

We’ll provide drinks and lunch!

How much does it cost?

We take payment in fun, effort and brainpower. There is no entry fee, you just need to a RSVP on Lanyrd.

Where?

We’ll be meeting at White October to kick off coding at 8.30AM. Although that’s pretty early for a Saturday, we’re sychronising with groups from Cologne, Munich and Barcelona (so far). The upside is that it’s early enough for pastries!

All we ask is that if you can’t make it you update your RSVP so we can get that space to someone else.

That sounds great, how can I help?

At the moment we’d be really grateful for:

  • Sponsorship! Help us provide codefuel to keep the creative juices flowing.
  • Help on the day. There’s plenty of setting up and clearing down, as well as keeping the day running smoothly. Get in touch if you’re keen to help out.
  • Spread the word. Most important of all, shout it from the rooftops (or just use Twitter…).

Other things

Haybrook IT Resourcing have kindly sponsored breakfast pastries and lunch. Be sure to chat to Sarah over coffee before the event and say how great the food is! We also have a JetBrains WebStorm license to give away - we’ll pick a winner from the attendees on the day.

As if that wasn’t enough, we’ve got a number of 10% discount codes for the JSDay conference in Verona.


And we’re back! …on a TUESDAY!?!

This month we're talking about getting our code running in the real world. Come along to find out how to deploy apps with heroku and how continuous deployment can help you build software faster and with less stress.


Node + Heroku + Unrealistic time constraints

with Pete West @peterjwest

Can you build and deploy a site in 5 minutes from scratch? This will be a live code session where I try to do node and heroku at speed, and explain it at the same time. May well be a codetastrophe, heckling encouraged!

Pete did a great job of deploying jsox.herokuapp.com in (slightly over) 10 minutes. He covered github, npm, express, jade, bower & bootstrap.


Continuous Deployment or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Failed Build

with Roy Lines @roylinesuk

Dr Strangelove

This photo is the talk description - we think that might be a good thing

Roy gave an awesome overview of his continous deployment process, his slides are available here.


Bring yOur Own hYperlink Along

with Everyone!

This worked pretty well last time, so we'll do it again!

We all bring a link to js-based project/post/anything that you find interesting and we'll have a quick chat about it.

We’ve cancelled BOOYA because there’s a GITHUB DRINKUP IN TOWN

…If we start promptly at 7.30, and hold Pete to his unrealistic time constraints. We’ll have plenty of time to make it across town for the drink up.

Also, if this is the first you’ve heard about the drink up; you totally need to come along with us - it’s the polite thing to do! (and, it’s the rules)


As usual, we’ll be meeting at White October at 7.30PM - we’d appreciate if you attend on lanyrd (it lets us know how many drinks and snacks to get in!).


Join us for the last meetup of 2013 where we'll be talking about using streams in node and chattting about some new JS Projects

Indestructible twitter streams with node

by Ben @benjaminbenben

The twitter streaming apis are totally fun and super awesome.

I’ll cover the (surprisingly detailed) data that we can get from the streams, and some of the challenges that we have to face to maintain a connection.

We’ll delve into the node stream API - and how we can use this to abstract a robust interface to the twitter apis that can survive network failures, stale connections and modifying query parameters.

Then we’ll talk about some of the awesome projects/hacks that we can do when we are able to dynamically alter parameters.


by Everyone!

We’re going to try a new type of session, bring a few links to js-based projects that you find interesting and we’ll go through them and have a quick chat.

It doesn’t matter if you don’t know anything about the project, just anything that you find interesting or cool!


Nodecopter via @chvck

Nodecopters are cool

Calculating element vertex data from CSS transforms via @benjaminbenben

When you want to do complex calculations based on the transforms of elements, you might be better using webGL (counter argument: have you used webGL?)

Stop Being Cute and Clever via @ghickman

Went over why [1,2,3].map(parseInt) evaluates to [1, NaN, NaN], talked about dependency management for other languages and how projects like rails-assets can allow cross dependency integration. Touched briefly on PHP.

jQuery matchers and fixture loader for Jasmine framework via @floehopper

None of us actively/formally use fixtures in our JS projects.

Every javascript project you should be looking into via @jopotts

We liked how the library examples load in the same site and wondered if the projects were ordered by reverse popularity. @jopotts said he would have chosen this link if he’d actually thought about it.


For the night before All Your Base we're teaming up with Oxford Python for a data-based* super-mega-meetup

Please note - this event won’t be at our usual venue, but at Oxford University IT Services

Ten Things You Didn’t Know About D3

### by Anna Powell-Smith @darkgreener

D3 (Data-Driven Documents) is the world-conquering Javascript library for building beautiful data visualizations. It’s the sixth most starred repo on GitHub, and it’s taking over the universe. If you’re new to D3, I’ll take you through the basics. If you’re already a fan, I’ll show you ten things you didn’t know you could do in D3.


Mobile Oxford, an aspirational API to the University

### by Dave King @davbo

Mobile Oxford is a web application for people living in and around Oxford developed by the University. This talk will discuss the technical aspects of developing a generic HTTP API for use throughout the University (and beyond!) along with the JavaScript client for Mobile Oxford itself.


Other things

Cloudant have generously offered to get in some drinks for the evening! We also have a limited number of All Your Base discount codes if you don’t have a ticket (hit us up on twitter if you’re interested). Also - this event is part of Digital Oxford Week, there are some great events through the week - so do check it out.


This month we have a special speaker coming to talk about cross platform automated testing your JS.

Appium: Javascript-powered Mobile Automation by Jonathan Lipps

Appium

Appium is an open-source cross-platform mobile automation tool built in Node.js. The source and community are online at https://github.com/appium/appium. Appium’s interesting to JS devs for a number of reasons, not least because of the pressing need for better automation and CI tools in the mobile space in general.

Jonathan Lipps has been making things out of code as long as he can remember. He currently works as a Senior Software Developer for Sauce Labs, which enables him to write code for various open-source projects, like Appium (for which he’s the primary architect and contributor). Jonathan has worked as a programmer in the startup world on and off for over a decade, and given talks on software development at conferences around the world, but is also passionate about academic discussion. Jonathan has master’s degrees in philosophy and linguistics, from Stanford and Oxford respectively. Living in San Francisco, he’s an avid homebrewer, rock climber, and writer on topics he considers vital, like the relationship of technology to what it means to be human.


…And we're back!

It’s been a long summer break, though we’ve got a nice range of talks for a welcome back JSOxford

Getting started with Node.js by Kevin Carmody

This talk will help you get started with server-side JavaScript in Node.js. It’ll show you how to get setup, start adding packages, communicate with 3rd party services and persisting data to a simple document store.

Hands on PhantomJS by Ben Foxall

I talked about “Serving websites to websites with PhantomJS” at the recent Oxford Geek Night. This is going to be a more practical session - I’ll go through creating a PhantomJS script, setting up the web server and deploying your service to heroku.

Working with a large node project: Ghost by Gabor Javorszky

I will talk about how developing a huge project in node works for us. There are currently about 15 people collaborating on the same codebase from the US to Australia. What are the logistics of it, how is the codebase structured, and what are some interesting gotchas we have managed to run into along the way.

Attend on - lanyrd (so we know how much beer to get in)

August JSOxford


This month we have a selection of talks from our members - lanyrd.

As usual, come to White October (map) for 7.30 - we’ll aim to start the talks by 7.45.

  • Gabor Javorszky - Deploying with GruntJS - I was introduced to Grunt.js a short while ago. Since then, I’ve gotten rid of a ton of apps and settings: a) Codekit b) SFTP plugin on Sublime. Basically, all the tasks you would need to do under one roof living in one configuration file at the end of one command. I’ll show what I use it for, and how I got there.

  • Charles Dixon - A quick introduction to nosql - Part 1 of 3. In this talk we’ll cover why maybe we don’t want to use a relational DB for some things and we’ll look at the 4 “main” types of nosql databases currently in use.

  • Ben Foxall - Win Win communication - Experiences on the web don’t have to be constrained to a single browser window: we’ll go over some of the technologies that allow data to be shared across multiple windows or devices.


We're organising a hack day as a fringe event around the jQuery UK conference. We'll be driving RC cars around with a node.js library.

dension wirc car

If you want more information - please contact with us at jsoxford@whiteoctober.co.uk or @jsoxford.

More details are on the event page and on lanyrd.

Thanks to our sponsors

This hack day wouldn’t have been possible without our car sponsors:

Infragistics

### Blackberry ### Caplin ### White October


Information for Attendees

IMPORTANT: If you have a ticket and are are unable to make it to the hack day, please tell us and we’ll try and find someone to take your place


Where and when?

We’ll be hacking from 9am on Saturday morning at the King’s Centre in Botley, Oxford. Try to be prompt - there’s a lot of hacking to do! We’ve got the space till 6pm.

If you went to jQuery UK the day before - you’ve already been there!

What do I need to bring?

Ideally a laptop with libkoki on it. We won’t have any spare machines to hack with, so make sure you bring one!

What’s for breakfast?

Croissants and Pain au Chocolate. Orange and apple juice. Coffee!!!!1!!

What’s for lunch?

Baguettes, samosas, pastries, fruit. Orange and apple juice.

Where am I?

If all else fails, give us a call on 07540838982 (Ben), 07540838982 (Kevin) or 07565631681 (Pete).

We’ll also be kicking about out on irc: #jsoxford at irc.freenode.net if you want to ask questions.


This hack day is part of Digital Oxford Week


This month we heard about TiddlyWiki and had a couple of impromptu demos - lanyrd

  • Jeremy Ruston gave us a fantastic overview TiddlyWiki and his 25 year reboot project TiddlyWiki5.
  • John told us about kinetic text and how he’s been building a demo with html/css/js.
  • Pete told us about the hack day and our progress of building a node.js library for controlling Dension Smart Racers.

In February - We looked at JS and gaming - lanyrd

  • Kevin and Ben showed us multi device gaming with websockets in a game called Twon.
  • Pete showed us how to implement a basic physics engine in JS with vector maths using Sylvester. Pete’s example code (also now with and implementation of the GJK collision detection algorithm) is up on github
  • Matt showed us the power of eval in creating his ZX Spectrum emulator - jsspeccy

In January - we went for a theme of frontend - lanyrd

  • Matt told us about the JS Audio APIS and library used to create the torchbox christmas choir
  • Henry took us through some “front-endery tools” including bl.ocks.org, sublime text tricks and more!
  • Tom premiered his new cross-browser dom generation library dome.js
  • Kevin was going to tell us about knockout, backbone & angular js - but we ran out of time…

Our first JS Oxford meet - lanyrd

  • Ben spoke about reading tweets with the twitter streaming api, and displaying them on a map more info on his blog.
  • Pete spoke about using mongoDB and nodejs to build an search interface for magic cards.
  • Kevin told us about knockout.js and how he used it in a node knockout entry.

First Meet


You can find more events in the Events Archive.